remove use of deprecated \it
authorTobias Pape <tobias@netshed.de>
Fri, 27 Dec 2013 15:02:58 +0000 (16:02 +0100)
committerTobias Pape <tobias@netshed.de>
Sat, 28 Dec 2013 00:23:41 +0000 (01:23 +0100)
src/practical_settings/im.tex
src/practical_settings/vpn.tex
src/theory/PKIs.tex
src/theory/cipher_suites/architecture.tex

index b3cfbc8..305cbd9 100644 (file)
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 
 \subsubsection{General server configuration recommendations}
 
-For servers, we mostly recommend to apply what's proposed by the {\it Peter's manifesto}\footnote{https://github.com/stpeter/manifesto}.
+For servers, we mostly recommend to apply what's proposed by the \emph{Peter's manifesto}\footnote{https://github.com/stpeter/manifesto}.
 
 In short:
 \begin{itemize}
@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ There are no specific configurations required but the protocol itself is worth t
 
 \subsubsection{IRC}
 
-There are numerous implementations of IRC servers.  In this section, we choose {\it Charybdis} which serves as basis for {\it ircd-seven}\footnote{https://dev.freenode.net/redmine/projects/ircd-seven}, developed and used by freenode. Freenode is actually the biggest IRC network\footnote{http://irc.netsplit.de/networks/top10.php}.  {\it Charybdis} is part of the {\it Debian} \& {\it Ubuntu} distributions.
+There are numerous implementations of IRC servers.  In this section, we choose \emph{Charybdis} which serves as basis for \emph{ircd-seven}\footnote{https://dev.freenode.net/redmine/projects/ircd-seven}, developed and used by freenode. Freenode is actually the biggest IRC network\footnote{http://irc.netsplit.de/networks/top10.php}.  \emph{Charybdis} is part of the \emph{Debian} \& \emph{Ubuntu} distributions.
 
 \begin{lstlisting}[breaklines]
 /* Extensions */
index 503b607..13cd671 100644 (file)
@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ interval (\verb|reneg-bytes| or \verb|reneg-pkts|).
 \paragraph{Fixing ``easy-rsa''}\mbox{}
 
 When installing an OpenVPN server instance, you are probably using
-{\it easy-rsa} to generate keys and certificates.
+\emph{easy-rsa} to generate keys and certificates.
 The file \verb|vars| in the easyrsa installation directory has a
 number of settings that should be changed to secure values:
 
index a4da9f7..1fd462d 100644 (file)
@@ -5,8 +5,8 @@ Public-Key Infrastructures try to solve the problem of verifying
 whether a public key belongs to a given entity, so as to prevent Man
 In The Middle attacks.
 
-There are two approaches to achieve that: {\it Certificate Authorities}
-and the {\it Web of Trust}.
+There are two approaches to achieve that: \emph{Certificate Authorities}
+and the \emph{Web of Trust}.
 
 Certificate Authorities (CAs) sign end-entities' certificates, thereby
 associating some kind of identity (e.g. a domain name or an email
index 1415a57..2a2c818 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ authenticated encryption schemes. It consists of the following components:
 
 \begin{description}
 
-\item{\it Key exchange protocol:}
+\item[Key exchange protocol:]
 ``An (interactive) key exchange protocol is a method whereby parties who do not 
 share any secret information can generate a shared, secret key by communicating 
 over a public channel. The main property guaranteed here is that an 
@@ -18,24 +18,24 @@ line does not learn anything about the resulting secret key.'' \cite{katz2008int
 
 Example: \texttt{DHE}
 
-\item{\it Authentication:}
+\item[Authentication:]
 The client authenticates the server by its certificate. Optionally the server 
 may authenticate the client certificate.
 
 Example: \texttt{RSA}
 
-\item{\it Cipher:}
+\item[Cipher:]
 The cipher is used to encrypt the message stream. It also contains the key size
 and mode used by the suite.
 
 Example: \texttt{AES256}
 
-\item{\it Message authentication code (MAC):}
+\item[Message authentication code (MAC):]
 A MAC ensures that the message has not been tampered with (integrity).
 
 Examples: \texttt{SHA256}
 
-\item{\it Authenticated Encryption with Associated Data (AEAD):}
+\item[Authenticated Encryption with Associated Data (AEAD):]
 AEAD is a class of authenticated encryption block-cipher modes
 which take care of encryption as well as authentication (e.g. GCM, CCM mode). 
 
@@ -48,7 +48,6 @@ Example: \texttt{AES256-GCM}
 \framebox[1.1\width]{ \texttt{DHE} }--\framebox[1.1\width]{ \texttt{RSA} }--\framebox[1.1\width]{ \texttt{AES256} }--\framebox[1.1\width]{ \texttt{SHA256} } }
 \caption{Composition of a typical cipher string}
 \end{figure}
-
-\item {\textbf{A note on nomenclature:}} there are two common naming schemes for cipher strings -- IANA names (see section \ref{section:Links}) and the more well known OpenSSL names. In this document we will always use OpenSSL names unless a specific service uses IANA names.
-
 \end{description}
+%
+\paragraph*{A note on nomenclature:} there are two common naming schemes for cipher strings -- IANA names (see section \ref{section:Links}) and the more well known OpenSSL names. In this document we will always use OpenSSL names unless a specific service uses IANA names.