forward-port Philipp G├╝hring's changes (except for the cipher suite
authorAaron Kaplan <aaron@lo-res.org>
Fri, 22 Nov 2013 17:09:49 +0000 (18:09 +0100)
committerAaron Kaplan <aaron@lo-res.org>
Fri, 22 Nov 2013 17:09:49 +0000 (18:09 +0100)
string change which still should be discussed properly)

src/ECC.tex
src/GPG.tex
src/PKIs.tex
src/abstract.tex
src/cipher_suites.tex

index 02048fb..cbb5420 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ to understand - luckily there have been some great introductions on the topic la
 
 ECC provides for much stronger security with less computonally expensive
 operations in comparison to traditional PKI algorithms. (See the section 
-on keylenghts to get an idea)
+on keylengths to get an idea)
 
 
 The security of ECC relies on the elliptic curves and curve points chosen
index ca1863f..7bcde99 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 
-PGP uses assymetric encryption to protecte a sesion key which is used to encipher a message . Additionally, it signs messages via assymetric encryption and hash functions.
+PGP uses asymetric encryption to protecte a sesion key which is used to encipher a message . Additionally, it signs messages via asymetric encryption and hash functions.
 Since SHA-1 as hash function has been broken already in 2005\footnote{\url{https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2005/02/sha1\_broken.html}}, there are a couple of settings a PGP user can change to use different hashes.
 
 When using PGP, there are a couple of things to take care of:
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ When using PGP, there are a couple of things to take care of:
 \item preferences for hashing
 \end{itemize}
 
-Properly dealing with key material, passphrases and the web-of-trust  is outside of the scope of this document. The GnuPG website\footnote{\url{http://www.gnupg.org/}} has a good tutorial on PGP.
+Properly dealing with key material, passphrases and the web-of-trust is outside of the scope of this document. The GnuPG website\footnote{\url{http://www.gnupg.org/}} has a good tutorial on PGP.
 
 \subsubsection{Keylengths}
 We do not recommend any key length $\le$ 2048 bits. In fact, 4096 bits are probabaly a good choice at the time of this writing.
index 6cbe1da..805c546 100644 (file)
@@ -10,13 +10,13 @@ at the cost of introducing an actor that magically is more trustworthy.
 This section deals with settings related to trusting CAs.  However, our main
 recommendations for PKIs is: if you are able to run your own PKI and disable
 any other CA, do so.  This is mostly possible in any machine 2 machine
-communication systems where compatibility with externalities is not an issue.
+communication system where compatibility with externalities is not an issue.
 
 A good background on PKIs can be found in \todo{insert reference}.
 
 \todo{ts: Background and Configuration (EMET) of Certificate Pinning, TLSA integration, 
   When to use self-signed certificates, how to get certificates from public CA authorities 
-  (CACert, StartSSL), Best-practices how to create CA and how to generate private keys/CSRs, 
+  (CACert, StartSSL), Best-practices how to create CA and how to generate private keys/CSRs, 
   Discussion about OCSP and CRLs. TD: Useful Firefox plugins: CipherFox, Conspiracy, Perspectives.}
 
 
index 2598a42..10fd7a4 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 
 This whitepaper arose out of the need for system administrators to have an
 updated, solid, well researched and thought-through guide for configuring SSL,
-PGP, SSH and other cryptographic tools in the post-Snowden age.  Triggered by the NSA
+PGP, SSH and other cryptographic tools in the post-Snowden age. Triggered by the NSA
 leaks in the summer of 2013, many system administrators and IT security
 officers saw the need to strengthen their encryption settings.
 This guide is specifically written for these system administrators.
@@ -23,16 +23,16 @@ communications.
 This whitepaper can only address one aspect of securing our information
 systems: getting the crypto settings right. Other attacks, as the above
 mentioned, require different protection schemes which are not covered in this
-whitepaper.  This whitepaper is \textbf{not} an introduction to cryptography
-on how to use PGP nor SSL.  For background information on cryptography,
+whitepaper. This whitepaper is \textbf{not} an introduction to cryptography
+on how to use PGP nor SSL. For background information on cryptography,
 cryptoanalysis, PGP and SSL we would like to refer the reader to the the chapters \ref{section:Tools}, \ref{section:Links} and \ref{section:Suggested_Reading} at the end of this document.
 
 \vskip 0.5em
 
-The focus of this guide is merely to give current best practices  for
+The focus of this guide is merely to give current best practices for
 configuring complex cipher suites and related parameters in a \textbf{copy \&
-paste-able manner}.  The guide tries to stay as concise as is possible for such
-a complex topic as cryptography.  There are many guides and best practice
+paste-able manner}. The guide tries to stay as concise as is possible for such
+a complex topic as cryptography. There are many guides and best practice
 documents available when it comes to cryptography, however none of them focuses
 on what a system administrator needs to do precisely for his system to harden
 its security with respect to cipher suites.
index aee2666..42d89c8 100644 (file)
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ make a hard decision between locking out some users while keeping very high
 cipher suite security levels or supporting as many users as possible while
 lowering some settings. \url{https://www.ssllabs.com/} gives administrators a
 tool to test out different settings. The authors used ssllabs.com to arrive at
-a set of cipher suites which we will recommend throught this document.
+a set of cipher suites which we will recommend throughout this document.
 \textbf{Caution: these settings can only represent a subjective choice of the
 authors at the time of this writing. It might be a wise choice to select your
 own cipher suites based on the instructions in section
@@ -67,15 +67,16 @@ This results in the string:
 
 
 
+\todo{make a column for cipher chaining mode}
 \begin{center}
 
 \begin{tabular}{lllllll}
 \toprule
-\textbf{ID}   & \textbf{OpenSSL Name}       & \textbf{Version} & \textbf{KeyEx} & \textbf{Auth} & \textbf{Cipher} & \textbf{Hash}\\\cmidrule(lr){1-7}
+\textbf{ID}   & \textbf{OpenSSL Name}       & \textbf{Version} & \textbf{KeyEx} & \textbf{Auth} & \textbf{Cipher} & \textbf{MAC}\\\cmidrule(lr){1-7}
 \verb|0xC030| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD         \\
-\verb|0xC028| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA384       \\
+\verb|0xC028| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA384       \\
 \verb|0x009F| & DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384   & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD         \\
-\verb|0x006B| & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA256       \\
+\verb|0x006B| & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA256       \\
 \bottomrule
 \end{tabular}
 \end{center}
@@ -91,8 +92,8 @@ Win 7 and Win 8.1 crypto stack, Opera 17, OpenSSL $\ge$ 1.0.1e, Safari 6 / iOS
 
 \subsubsection{Configuration B: weaker ciphers, many clients}
 
-In this section we propose a slighly "weaker" set of cipher suites. There are
-some known weaknesses of for example SHA-1 which is included in this set.
+In this section we propose a slightly "weaker" set of cipher suites. For example, there are
+some known weaknesses for SHA-1 which is included in this set.
 However, the advantage of this set of cipher suites is its wider compatibility
 with clients. 
 
@@ -116,19 +117,19 @@ This results in the string:
 \end{lstlisting}
 
 
-
+\todo{make a column for cipher chaining mode}
 \begin{center}
 \begin{tabular}{lllllll}
 \toprule
-\textbf{ID}   & \textbf{OpenSSL Name}       & \textbf{Version} & \textbf{KeyEx} & \textbf{Auth} & \textbf{Cipher} & \textbf{Hash}\\\cmidrule(lr){1-7}
+\textbf{ID}   & \textbf{OpenSSL Name}       & \textbf{Version} & \textbf{KeyEx} & \textbf{Auth} & \textbf{Cipher} & \textbf{MAC}\\\cmidrule(lr){1-7}
 \verb|0xC030| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD         \\ 
-\verb|0xC028| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA384       \\ 
+\verb|0xC028| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA384       \\ 
 \verb|0x009F| & DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384   & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD         \\ 
-\verb|0x006B| & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA256       \\ 
+\verb|0x006B| & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA256       \\ 
 \verb|0x0088| & DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA     & SSLv3            & DH             &  RSA          & Camellia(256)   & SHA1         \\ 
-\verb|0xC014| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA        & SSLv3            & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA1         \\ 
-\verb|0x0039| & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA          & SSLv3            & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA1         \\ 
-\verb|0x0035| & AES256-SHA                  & SSLv3            & RSA            &  RSA          & AES(256)        & SHA1         \\
+\verb|0xC014| & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA        & SSLv3            & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA1         \\ 
+\verb|0x0039| & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA          & SSLv3            & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA1         \\ 
+\verb|0x0035| & AES256-SHA                  & SSLv3            & RSA            &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA1         \\
 \bottomrule
 \end{tabular}
 \end{center}