add quotation mark in add_header HSTS directive
[ach-master.git] / src / practical_settings / mailserver.tex
index 3dc75a6..d345518 100644 (file)
@@ -16,8 +16,8 @@ from an MDA usually via the Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) or the Post
 Office Protocol (POP).
 
 As MSAs and MTAs both use SMTP as transfer protocols, both functionalities may
-often may be implemented with the same software. On the other hand, MDA software
-may or may not implement both IMAP and POP.
+often be implemented with the same software. On the other hand, MDA software
+might or might not implement both IMAP and POP.
 
 %% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
 \subsection{TLS usage in mail server protocols}
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ command.
 
 SMTP between MTAs usually makes use of opportunistic TLS. This means that an
 MTA will accept TLS connections when asked for it but will not require it.
-MTAs should always try opportunistic TLS handshakes outgoing and always accept 
+MTAs should always try opportunistic TLS handshakes outgoing and always accept
 incoming opportunistic TLS.
 
 %% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -50,6 +50,8 @@ We recommend to use the following settings for Mail Transfer Agents:
   \item do not use self signed certificates
   \item accept all cipher suites, as the alternative would be to fall back to
     cleartext transmission
+  \item an execption to the last sentence is that MTAs \textit{MUST NOT} 
+    enable SSLv2 protocol support, due to the DROWN attack\footnote{\url{https://drownattack.com/drown-attack-paper.pdf}}.
 \end{itemize*}
 
 For MSA operation we recommend:
@@ -58,7 +60,7 @@ For MSA operation we recommend:
   \item optionally listen on port 465 with Implicit TLS
   \item enforce SMTP AUTH even for local networks
   \item ensure that SMTP AUTH is not allowed on unencrypted connections
-  \item use the recommended cipher suites if all connecting MUAs support them
+  \item only use the recommended cipher suites if all connecting MUAs support them
 \end{itemize*}
 
 For MDA operation we recommend:
@@ -69,6 +71,7 @@ For MDA operation we recommend:
   \item enforce authentication even for local networks
   \item make sure that authentication is not allowed on unencrypted connections
   \item use the recommended cipher suites if all connecting MUAs support them
+  \item turn off SSLv2 (DROWN attack\footnote{\url{https://drownattack.com/drown-attack-paper.pdf}})
 \end{itemize*}
 
 %% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -82,6 +85,7 @@ For MDA operation we recommend:
   \item Dovecot 2.2.13, Debian 8.2 Jessie
   \item Dovecot 2.0.19apple1 on OS X Server 10.8.5 (without: ``\texttt{ssl\_prefer\_server\_ciphers}``)
   \item Dovecot 2.2.9 on Ubuntu 14.04 trusty
+  \item Dovecot 2.2.31 on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
 \end{itemize*}
 
 \subsubsection{Settings}
@@ -190,6 +194,7 @@ openssl s_client -crlf -connect SERVER.TLD:993
 \begin{itemize*}
   \item Postfix 2.9.6, Debian Wheezy with OpenSSL 1.0.1e
   \item Postfix 2.11.0 on Ubuntu 14.04.02 with OpenSSL 1.0.1f
+  \item Postfix 3.1.0 on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
 \end{itemize*}
 
 
@@ -238,14 +243,14 @@ encryption we do not restrict the list of ciphers or protocols for communication
 with other mail servers to avoid transmission in plain text. There are still
 some steps needed to enable TLS, all in \verb|main.cf|:
 
-\configfile{main.cf}{22-33}{Opportunistic TLS in Postfix}
+\configfile{main.cf}{20-31}{Opportunistic TLS in Postfix}
 
 \paragraph{MSA:}
 For the MSA \verb|smtpd| process which communicates with mail clients, we first
 define the ciphers that are acceptable for the ``mandatory'' security level,
 again in \verb|main.cf|:
 
-\configfile{main.cf}{35-37}{MSA TLS configuration in Postfix}
+\configfile{main.cf}{34-44}{MSA TLS configuration in Postfix}
 
 Then, we configure the MSA smtpd in \verb|master.cf| with two
 additional options that are only used for this instance of smtpd:
@@ -253,7 +258,7 @@ additional options that are only used for this instance of smtpd:
 \configfile{master.cf}{12-14}{MSA smtpd service configuration in Postfix}
 
 For those users who want to use EECDH key exchange, it is possible to customize this via:
-\configfile{main.cf}{38-38}{EECDH customization in Postfix}
+\configfile{main.cf}{45-45}{EECDH customization in Postfix}
 The default value since Postfix 2.8 is ``strong''.
 
 \subsubsection{Limitations}
@@ -400,7 +405,7 @@ Do not limit ciphers without a very good reason. In the worst case you end up wi
 \paragraph{OpenSSL:}
 Exim already disables SSLv2 by default. We recommend to add
 \begin{lstlisting}
-openssl_options = +all +no_sslv2 +no_compression +cipher_server_preference
+openssl_options = +all +no_sslv2 +no_sslv3 +no_compression +cipher_server_preference
 \end{lstlisting}
 to the main configuration.
 
@@ -437,12 +442,12 @@ openssl s_client -starttls smtp -crlf -connect SERVER.TLD:25
 %\todo{FIXME: write this section}
 
 %% ----------------------------------------------------------------------
-\subsection{Cicso ESA/IronPort}
+\subsection{Cisco ESA/IronPort}
 \subsubsection{Tested with Version}
 \begin{itemize*}
   \item AsyncOS 7.6.1
   \item AsyncOS 8.5.6
-  \item AsyncOS 9.0.0 and 9.1.0
+  \item AsyncOS 9.0.0, 9.5.0, 9.6.0, 9.7.0
 \end{itemize*}
 
 \subsubsection{Settings}
@@ -487,7 +492,7 @@ sslconfig settings:
   Outbound SMTP method:  sslv3tlsv1
   Outbound SMTP ciphers: RC4-SHA:RC4-MD5:ALL
 \end{lstlisting}
-Note that starting with AsyncOS 9.0 SSLv3 is disabled by default, whereas the default cipher set is still \texttt{RC4-SHA:RC4-MD5:ALL} (see figure \ref{fig:ach_ironport_ssl_settings} on page \pageref{fig:ach_ironport_ssl_settings}). 
+Note that starting with AsyncOS 9.0 SSLv3 is disabled by default, whereas the default cipher set is still \texttt{RC4-SHA:RC4-MD5:ALL} (see figure \ref{fig:ach_ironport_ssl_settings} on page \pageref{fig:ach_ironport_ssl_settings}).
 
 \begin{figure}[p]
   \centering
@@ -496,7 +501,7 @@ Note that starting with AsyncOS 9.0 SSLv3 is disabled by default, whereas the de
   \label{fig:ach_ironport_ssl_settings}
 \end{figure}
 
-After committing these changes in the CLI, you have to activate the use of TLS in several locations. 
+After committing these changes in the CLI, you have to activate the use of TLS in several locations.
 
 For inbound connections, first select the appropriate certificate in the settings of each listener you want to have TLS enabled on (Network -> Listeners, see figure \ref{fig:ach_ironport_listener_cert} on page \pageref{fig:ach_ironport_listener_cert}). Afterwards, for each listener, configure all Mail Flow Policies which have their Connection Behavior set to ``Accept'' or ``Relay'' to at least prefer TLS (Mail Policies -> Mail Flow Policies, see figure \ref{fig:ach_ironport_mail_flow_tls} on page \pageref{fig:ach_ironport_mail_flow_tls}). \\
 It is recommended to also enable TLS in the default Mail Flow Policy, because these settings will be inherited by newly created policies, unless specifically overwritten. \\
@@ -516,7 +521,7 @@ TLS can be enforced by creating a new Mail Flow Policy with TLS set to ``require
   \label{fig:ach_ironport_mail_flow_tls}
 \end{figure}
 
-TLS settings for outbound connections have to be configured within the Destination Controls (Mail Policies -> Destination Controls). Chose the appropriate SSL certificate within the global settings and configure TLS to be preferred in the default profile to enable it for all outbound connections. After these two steps the Destination Control overview page should look like figure \ref{fig:ach_ironport_dest_control} on page \pageref{fig:ach_ironport_dest_control}. 
+TLS settings for outbound connections have to be configured within the Destination Controls (Mail Policies -> Destination Controls). Choose the appropriate SSL certificate within the global settings and configure TLS to be preferred in the default profile to enable it for all outbound connections. After these two steps the Destination Control overview page should look like figure \ref{fig:ach_ironport_dest_control} on page \pageref{fig:ach_ironport_dest_control}. 
 To enforce TLS for a specific destination domain, add an entry to the Destination Control Table and set ``TLS Support'' to ``required''.
 
 \begin{figure}[p]
@@ -527,7 +532,7 @@ To enforce TLS for a specific destination domain, add an entry to the Destinatio
 \end{figure}
 
 \subsubsection{Limitations}
-All current General Deployment AsyncOS releases use OpenSSL 0.9.8. Therefore TLS 1.2 is not supported and some of the suggested ciphers won't work. Starting with AsyncOS 9.5, which is available as Limited Deployment Release as of June 2015, TLS 1.2 is supported.\footnote{\url{http://www.cisco.com/c/dam/en/us/td/docs/security/esa/esa9-5/ESA_9-5_Release_Notes.pdf}, Changed Behaviour, page 4} You can check the supported ciphers on the CLI by using the option \texttt{verify} from within the \texttt{sslconfig} command:
+All AsyncOS releases prior to version 9.5 use OpenSSL 0.9.8. Therefore TLS 1.2 is not supported in these versions and some of the suggested ciphers won't work. Starting with AsyncOS 9.5 TLS 1.2 is fully supported.\footnote{\url{http://www.cisco.com/c/dam/en/us/td/docs/security/esa/esa9-5/ESA_9-5_Release_Notes.pdf}, Changed Behaviour, page 4} You can check the supported ciphers on the CLI by using the option \texttt{verify} from within the \texttt{sslconfig} command:
 \begin{lstlisting}{foo}
 []> verify