updated/fixed keylength recommendations based on Ecrypt Paper
[ach-master.git] / src / theory / keylengths.tex
index 980cafb..2b450b1 100644 (file)
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ long it must be protected.  In other words: consider the number of years the
 data needs to stay confidential.
 
 
-The ECRYPT II publication (\cite{ii2011ecrypt}) gives a fascinating overview of
+The ECRYPT II publication~\cite{ii2011ecrypt} gives a fascinating overview of
 strengths of symmetric keys in chapter 5 and chapter 7. Summarizing ECRYPT II, we
 recommend 128 bit of key strength for symmetric keys. In ECRYPT II, this is
 considered safe for security level 7, long term protection.
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ In the same ECRYPT II publication you can find a practical comparison of key siz
 equivalence between symmetric key sizes and RSA, discrete log (DLOG) and EC
 keylengths. ECRYPT II arrives at the interesting conclusion that for an
 equivalence of 128 bit symmetric size, you will need to use an 3248 bit RSA
-key. See chapter 7 of \cite{ii2011ecrypt}, page 30.
+key~\cite[chapter 7, page 30]{ii2011ecrypt}.
 
 
 There are a couple of other studies comparing keylengths and their respective
@@ -48,9 +48,9 @@ this web site.
 \paragraph{Summary}
 \begin{itemize}
 
-\item For traditional asymmetric public-key cryptography we consider any key
-length below 2048 bits to be deprecated at the time of this writing (for long
-term protection).  
+\item For asymmetric public-key cryptography we consider any key length below
+3248 bits to be deprecated at the time of this writing (for long term
+protection).
 
 \item For elliptic curve cryptography we consider key lengths below 256 bits to
 be inadequate for long term protection.  
@@ -66,8 +66,3 @@ on the NIST Special Publication 800-57
 \footnote{\url{http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/PubsSPs.html\#800-57-part1},
 pages 63 and 64}, it is clear that 3DES can only be considered to provide for
 80 bits / 112 bits security.
-
-
-
-
-