b866a8feae63658a8709c8aa22ddf98cc443925d
[ach-master.git] / src / practical_settings.tex
1 \section{Recommendations on practical settings}
2
3
4 \subsection{SSL}
5
6 %%% NOTE: we do not need to list this all here, can move to an appendix
7 %At the time of this writing, SSL is defined in RFCs:   
8 %
9 %\begin{itemize}
10 %\item RFC2246 - TLS1.0         
11 %\item RFC3268 - AES            
12 %\item RFC4132 - Camelia                
13 %\item RFC4162 - SEED           
14 %\item RFC4279 - PSK            
15 %\item RFC4346 - TLS 1.1                
16 %\item RFC4492 - ECC            
17 %\item RFC4785 - PSK\_NULL              
18 %\item RFC5246 - TLS 1.2                
19 %\item RFC5288 - AES\_GCM               
20 %\item RFC5289 - AES\_GCM\_SHA2\_ECC            
21 %\item RFC5430 - Suite B                
22 %\item RFC5487 - GCM\_PSK               
23 %\item RFC5489 - ECDHE\_PSK             
24 %\item RFC5932 - Camelia                
25 %\item RFC6101 - SSL 3.0                
26 %\item RFC6209 - ARIA           
27 %\item RFC6367 - Camelia                
28 %\item RFC6655 - AES\_CCM               
29 %\item RFC7027 - Brainpool Curves               
30 %\end{itemize}
31
32 \subsubsection{Overview of SSL Server settings}
33
34 Most Server software (Webservers, Mail servers, etc.) can be configured to prefer certain cipher suites over others. 
35 We followed the recommendations by Ivan Ristic's SSL/TLS Deployment Best Practices\footnote{\url{https://www.ssllabs.com/projects/best-practices/index.html}} document (see section 2.2 "Use Secure Protocols") and arrived at a list of recommended cipher suites for SSL enabled servers.
36
37 Following Ivan Ristic's adivce we arrived at a categorisation of cipher suites.
38
39 \begin{center}
40 \begin{tabular}{| l | l | l | l | l|}
41 \hline
42 & Version   & Key\_Exchange  & Cipher    & MAC       \\ \hline
43 \cellcolor{green}prefer  & TLS 1.2   & DHE\_DSS   & AES\_256\_GCM   & SHA384        \\ \hline
44     &   & DHE\_RSA   & AES\_256\_CCM   & SHA256        \\ \hline
45     &   & ECDHE\_ECDSA   & AES\_256\_CBC   &       \\ \hline
46     &   & ECDHE\_RSA &   &       \\ \hline
47     &   &   &   &       \\ \hline
48 \cellcolor{orange}consider    & TLS 1.1   & DH\_DSS    & AES\_128\_GCM   & SHA       \\ \hline
49     & TLS 1.0   & DH\_RSA    & AES\_128\_CCM   &       \\ \hline
50     &   & ECDH\_ECDSA    & AES\_128\_CBC   &       \\ \hline
51     &   & ECDH\_RSA  & CAMELLIA\_256\_CBC  &       \\ \hline
52     &   & RSA   & CAMELLIA\_128\_CBC  &       \\ \hline
53     &   &   &   &       \\ \hline
54 \cellcolor{red}avoid   
55 & SSL 3.0   & NULL  & NULL  & NULL      \\ \hline
56     &   & DH\_anon   & RC4\_128   & MD5       \\ \hline
57     &   & ECDH\_anon & 3DES\_EDE\_CBC  &       \\ \hline
58     &   &   & DES\_CBC   &       \\ \hline
59     &   &   &   &       \\ \hline
60 \cellcolor{blue}{\color{white}special }
61 &   & PSK   & CAMELLIA\_256\_GCM  &       \\ \hline
62     &   & DHE\_PSK   & CAMELLIA\_128\_GCM  &       \\ \hline
63     &   & RSA\_PSK   & ARIA\_256\_GCM  &       \\ \hline
64     &   & ECDHE\_PSK & ARIA\_256\_CBC  &       \\ \hline
65     &   &   & ARIA\_128\_GCM  &       \\ \hline
66     &   &   & ARIA\_128\_CBC  &       \\ \hline
67     &   &   & SEED  &       \\ \hline
68 \end{tabular}
69 \end{center}
70
71 A remark on the ``consider'' section: the BSI (Federal office for information security, Germany) recommends in its technical report TR-02102-2\footnote{\url{https://www.bsi.bund.de/SharedDocs/Downloads/DE/BSI/Publikationen/TechnischeRichtlinien/TR02102/BSI-TR-02102-2_pdf.html}} to \textbf{avoid} non-ephemeral\footnote{ephemeral keys are session keys which are destroyed upon termination of the encrypted session. In TLS/SSL, they are realized by the DHE cipher suites. } keys for any communication which might contain personal or sensitive data. In this document, we follow BSI's advice and therefore only keep cipher suites containing (EC)DH\textbf{E} (ephemeral) variants. System administrators, who can not use forward secrecy can still use the cipher suites in the ``consider'' section. We however, do not recommend them in this document.
72
73 %% NOTE: s/forward secrecy/perfect forward secrecy???
74
75 Note that the entries marked as ``special'' are cipher suites which are not common to all clients (webbrowsers etc).
76
77
78 \subsubsection{Tested clients}
79  
80 Next we tested the cipher suites above on the following clients:
81
82 %% NOTE: we need to test with more systems!!
83 \begin{itemize}
84 \item Chrome 30.0.1599.101 Mac OS X 10.9
85 \item Safari 7.0 Mac OS X 10.9
86 \item Firefox 25.0 Mac OS X 10.9
87 \item Internet Explorer 10 Windows 7
88 \item Apple iOS 7.0.3
89 \end{itemize}
90
91
92 The result of testing the cipher suites with these clients gives us a preference order as shown in table \ref{table:prefOrderCipherSuites}. 
93 Should a client not be able to use a specific cipher suite, it will fall back to the next possible entry as given by the ordering.
94
95 \begin{center}
96 \begin{table}[h]
97 \small
98     \begin{tabular}{|l|l|l|l|l|}
99     \hline
100     Pref & Cipher Suite                                   & ID         & Browser                     \\ \hline
101     1    & TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_GCM\_SHA384     &     0x009f & OpenSSL command line client \\ \hline
102     2    & TLS\_ECDHE\_ECDSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA384 &     0xC024 & Safari                      \\ \hline
103     3    & TLS\_ECDHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA384   &     0xC028 & Safari                      \\ \hline
104     4    & TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA256     &     0x006B & Safari, Chrome              \\ \hline
105     5    & TLS\_ECDHE\_ECDSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA    &     0xC00A & Safari, Chrome, Firefox, IE \\ \hline
106     6    & TLS\_ECDHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA      &     0xC014 & Safari, Chrome, Firefox, IE \\ \hline
107     7    & TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA        &     0x0039 & Safari, Chrome, Firefox     \\ \hline
108     8    & TLS\_DHE\_DSS\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA        &     0x0038 & Firefox, IE                 \\ \hline
109     9    & TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_CAMELLIA\_256\_CBC\_SHA   &     0x0088 & Firefox                     \\ \hline
110     10   & TLS\_DHE\_DSS\_WITH\_CAMELLIA\_256\_CBC\_SHA   &     0x0087 & Firefox                     \\ \hline
111     \end{tabular}
112 \caption{Preference order of cipher suites}
113 \label{table:prefOrderCipherSuites}
114 \end{table}
115 \end{center}
116
117
118 Table \ref{table:prefOrderOpenSSLNames} shows the same data again with specifying the corresponding OpenSSL name.
119
120 \begin{center}
121 \begin{table}[h]
122 \small
123     \begin{tabular}{|l|l|l|}
124     \hline
125     Cipher Suite                                   & ID         & OpenSSL Name                  \\ \hline
126     TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_GCM\_SHA384     &     0x009f &         DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 \\ \hline
127     TLS\_ECDHE\_ECDSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA384 &     0xC024 &     ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384 \\ \hline
128     TLS\_ECDHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA384   &     0xC028 &     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384   \\ \hline
129     TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA256     &     0x006B &     DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256     \\ \hline
130     TLS\_ECDHE\_ECDSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA    &     0xC00A &     ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA    \\ \hline
131     TLS\_ECDHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA      &     0xC014 &     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA      \\ \hline
132     TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA        &     0x0039 &     DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA        \\ \hline
133     TLS\_DHE\_DSS\_WITH\_AES\_256\_CBC\_SHA        &     0x0038 &     DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA        \\ \hline
134     TLS\_DHE\_RSA\_WITH\_CAMELLIA\_256\_CBC\_SHA   &     0x0088 &     DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA   \\ \hline
135     TLS\_DHE\_DSS\_WITH\_CAMELLIA\_256\_CBC\_SHA   &     0x0087 &     DHE-DSS-CAMELLIA256-SHA   \\ \hline
136     \end{tabular}
137 \caption{Preference order of cipher suites, with OpenSSL names}
138 \label{table:prefOrderOpenSSLNames}
139 \end{table}
140 \end{center}
141
142 Note: the tables \ref{table:prefOrderOpenSSLNames} and \ref{table:prefOrderCipherSuites} contain Elliptic curve key exchanges. There are currently strong doubts\footnote{\url{http://safecurves.cr.yp.to/rigid.html}} concerning ECC.
143 If unsure, remove the cipher suites starting with ECDHE in the table above.
144
145
146 Based on this ordering, we can now define the corresponding settings for servers. We will start with the most common web servers
147
148 \subsubsection{Apache}
149
150 Note: a "\textbackslash" (backslash) denotes a line continuation which was wrapped due to formatting reasons here. Do not copy it verbatim.
151
152 %-All +TLSv1.1 +TLSv1.2
153 \begin{verbatim}
154   SSLProtocol All -SSLv2 -SSLv3 
155   SSLHonorCipherOrder On
156   SSLCompression off
157   # Add six earth month HSTS header for all users...
158   Header add Strict-Transport-Security "max-age=15768000"
159   # If you want to protect all subdomains, use the following header
160   # ALL subdomains HAVE TO support https if you use this!
161   # Strict-Transport-Security: max-age=15768000 ; includeSubDomains
162
163   SSLCipherSuite  DHE+AESGCM:\
164     ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:\
165     DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:\
166     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:\
167     DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA:\
168     DHE-DSS-CAMELLIA256-SHA:!ADH:!AECDH:!MD5:!DSS
169 \end{verbatim}
170
171 Note again, that any cipher suite starting with ECDHE  can be omitted in case of doubt.
172 %% XXX NOTE TO SELF: remove from future automatically generated lists!
173
174 You should redirect everything to httpS:// if possible. In Apache you can do this with the following setting inside of a VirtualHost environment:
175
176 \begin{verbatim}
177   <VirtualHost *:80>
178    #...
179    RewriteEngine On
180         RewriteRule ^.*$ https://%{SERVER_NAME}%{REQUEST_URI} [L,R=permanent]
181    #...
182   </VirtualHost>
183 \end{verbatim}
184
185 %XXXX   ECDH+AES256:DH+AES256:ECDH+AES128:DH+AES:ECDH+3DES:DH+3DES:RSA+AES:RSA+3DES:!ADH:!AECDH:!MD5:!DSS
186
187
188 \subsubsection{lighttpd}
189
190 %% Note: need to be checked / reviewed
191
192 %% Complete ssl.cipher-list with same algo than Apache
193 %% Currently this is only the default proposed lighttpd config for SSL
194 \begin{verbatim}
195   $SERVER["socket"] == "0.0.0.0:443" {
196     ssl.engine  = "enable"
197     ssl.use-sslv2 = "disable"
198     ssl.use-sslv3 = "disable"
199     ssl.use-compression = "disable"
200     ssl.pemfile = "/etc/lighttpd/server.pem"
201     ssl.cipher-list = "DHE+AESGCM:\
202       ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:\
203       DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:\
204       ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:\
205       DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA:\
206       DHE-DSS-CAMELLIA256-SHA:!ADH:!AECDH:!MD5:!DSS"
207     ssl.honor-cipher-order = "enable"
208   }
209 \end{verbatim}
210
211 As for any other webserver, you should redirect automatically http traffic toward httpS:\footnote{That proposed configuration is directly coming from lighttpd documentation: \url{http://redmine.lighttpd.net/projects/1/wiki/HowToRedirectHttpToHttps}}
212
213 \begin{verbatim}
214   $HTTP["scheme"] == "http" {
215     # capture vhost name with regex conditiona -> %0 in redirect pattern
216     # must be the most inner block to the redirect rule
217     $HTTP["host"] =~ ".*" {
218         url.redirect = (".*" => "https://%0$0")
219     }
220   }
221 \end{verbatim}
222
223 \subsubsection{nginx}
224
225 \begin{verbatim}
226   ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
227   ssl_protocols -SSLv2 -SSLv3; 
228   ssl_ciphers DHE+AESGCM:\
229     ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:\
230     DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:\
231     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:\
232     DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA:\
233     DHE-DSS-CAMELLIA256-SHA:!ADH:!AECDH:!MD5:!DSS;
234   add_header Strict-Transport-Security max-age=2592000;
235   add_header X-Frame-Options DENY;
236 \end{verbatim}
237
238 %% XXX FIXME: do we need to specify dhparams? Parameter: ssl_dhparam = file. See: http://wiki.nginx.org/HttpSslModule#ssl_protocols
239
240
241 If you decide to trust NIST's ECC curve recommendation, you can add the following line to nginx's configuration file to select special curves:
242
243 \begin{verbatim}
244   ssl_ecdh_curve          sect571k1;
245 \end{verbatim}
246
247 You should redirect everything to httpS:// if possible. In Nginx you can do this with the following setting:
248
249 \begin{verbatim}
250   rewrite     ^(.*)   https://$host$1 permanent;
251 \end{verbatim}
252
253 %\subsubsection{openssl.conf settings}
254
255 %\subsubsection{Differences in SSL libraries: gnutls vs. openssl vs. others}
256
257 \subsubsection{MS IIS}
258 \label{sec:ms-iis}
259
260 When trying to avoid RC4 and CBC (BEAST-Attack) and requiring perfect
261 forward secrecy, Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) supports
262 ECDSA, but does not support RSA for key exchange (consider ECC suite
263 B doubts\footnote{\url{http://safecurves.cr.yp.to/rigid.html}}).
264
265 Since \verb|ECDHE_RSA_*| is not supported, a SSL certificate based on
266 elliptic curves needs to be used.
267
268 The configuration of cipher suites MS IIS will use can be configured in one
269 of the following ways:
270 \begin{enumerate}
271 \item Group Policy \footnote{\url{http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb870930(v=vs.85).aspx}}
272 \item Registry
273 \item IIS Crypto~\footnote{\url{https://www.nartac.com/Products/IISCrypto/}}
274 \end{enumerate}
275
276
277 Table~\ref{tab:MS_IIS_Client_Support} shows the process of turning on
278 one algorithm after another and the effect on the supported Clients
279 tested using https://www.ssllabs.com.
280
281 \verb|SSL 3.0|, \verb|SSL 2.0| and \verb|MD5| are turned off.
282 \verb|TLS 1.0| and \verb|TLS 2.0| are turned on.
283
284 \begin{table}[h]
285   \centering
286   \small
287   \begin{tabular}{|l|l|}
288     \hline
289     Cipher Suite & Client \\
290     \hline
291     \verb|TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256| & only IE 10,11, OpenSSL 1.0.1e \\
292     \hline
293     \verb|TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256| & Chrome 30, Opera 17, Safari 6+ \\
294     \hline
295     \verb|TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA| & FF 10-24, IE 8+, Safari 5, Java 7\\
296     \hline
297   \end{tabular}
298   \caption{Client support}
299   \label{tab:MS_IIS_Client_Support}
300 \end{table}
301
302 Table~\ref{tab:MS_IIS_Client_Support} shows the algoriths from
303 strongest to weakest and why they need to be added in this order. For
304 example insiting on SHA-2 algorithms (only first two lines) would
305 eliminate all versions of Firefox, so the last line is needed to
306 support this browser, but should be placed at the bottom, so capable
307 browsers will choose the stronger SHA-2 algorithms.
308
309 \verb|TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA| or equivalent should also be added if
310 MS Terminal Server Connection is used (make sure to use this only in a
311 trusted environment). This suite will not be used for SSL, since we do
312 not use a RSA Key.
313
314
315 % \verb|TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256| ... only supported by: IE 10,11, OpenSSL 1.0.1e
316 % \verb|TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256| ... Chrome 30, Opera 17, Safari 6+
317 % \verb|TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA| ... Firefox 10-24, IE 8+, Safari 5, Java 7
318
319
320 Not supported Clients:
321 \begin{enumerate}
322 \item Java 6
323 \item WinXP
324 \item Bing
325 \end{enumerate}
326
327
328
329 \subsubsection{Dovecot}
330
331 Dovecot 2.2:
332
333 % Example: http://dovecot.org/list/dovecot/2013-October/092999.html
334
335 \begin{verbatim}
336   ssl_cipher_list = DHE+AESGCM:\
337     ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:\
338     DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:\
339     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:\
340     DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA:\
341     DHE-DSS-CAMELLIA256-SHA:!ADH:!AECDH:!MD5:!DSS
342   ssl_prefer_server_ciphers = yes
343 \end{verbatim}
344
345 Dovecot 2.1: Almost as good as dovecot 2.2. Does not support ssl\_prefer\_server\_ciphers
346
347
348 \subsubsection{Cyrus}
349
350 \subsubsection{UW}
351
352 Another option to secure IMAPs servers is to place them behind an stunnel server. 
353
354 % XXX config von Adi?
355 % sslVersion = TLSv1
356 % ciphers = EDH+CAMELLIA256:EDH+aRSA:+SSLv3:!aNULL:!eNULL:!LOW:!3DES:!MD5:!EXP:!PSK:!SRP:!DSS:!RC4:!SEED:-AES128:!CAMELLIA128:!ECDSA:AES256-SHA:EDH+AES128;
357 % options = CIPHER_SERVER_PREFERENCE
358 % TIMEOUTclose = 1
359
360 \subsubsection{Postfix}
361
362 First, you need to generate Diffie Hellman parameters (please first take a look at the section \ref{section:PRNG}):
363
364 \begin{verbatim}
365   % openssl gendh -out /etc/postfix/dh_param_512.pem -2 512
366   % openssl gendh -out /etc/postfix/dh_param_1024.pem -2 1024
367 \end{verbatim}
368
369 Next, we specify these DH parameters in the postfix config file:
370
371 \begin{verbatim}
372   smtpd_tls_dh512_param_file = /etc/postfix/dh_param_512.pem
373   smtpd_tls_dh1024_param_file = /etc/postfix/dh_param_1024.pem
374 \end{verbatim}
375
376 You usually don't want restrictions on the ciphers for opportunistic
377 encryption, because any encryption is better than plain text. 
378
379 For submission (Port 587) or other special cases, however, you want to
380 enforce strong encryption. In addition to the below entries in
381 main.cf, you need to enable ``mandatory`` encryption for the
382 respective service, e.g. by adding ``-o
383 smtpd\_tls\_security\_level=encrypt'' to the submission smtpd in
384 master.cf.
385
386 % don't -- this influences opportunistic encryption
387 %  smtpd_tls_protocols = !SSLv2, !SSLv3
388
389 \begin{verbatim}
390   smtpd_tls_mandatory_protocols = !SSLv2, !SSLv3
391   tls_ssl_options=NO_COMPRESSION
392   smtpd_tls_mandatory_ciphers=high
393   tls_high_cipherlist=DHE+AESGCM:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:\
394     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:\
395     ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:\
396     DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA:DHE-DSS-CAMELLIA256-SHA:!ADH:!AECDH:\
397     !MD5:!DSS
398   tls_preempt_cipherlist = yes
399   tls_random_source = dev:/dev/urandom          
400     %% NOTE: might want to have /dev/random here + Haveged
401 \end{verbatim}
402   
403 For those users, who want to use ECC key exchange, it is possible to specify this via:
404 \begin{verbatim}
405   smtpd_tls_eecdh_grade = ultra
406 \end{verbatim}
407
408 You can check the settings by specifying  smtpd\_tls\_loglevel = 1 and then check the selected ciphers with the following command:
409 \begin{verbatim}
410 $ zegrep "TLS connection established from.*with cipher" /var/log/mail.log | \
411 > awk '{printf("%s %s %s %s\n", $12, $13, $14, $15)}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
412       1 SSLv3 with cipher DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
413      23 TLSv1.2 with cipher DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
414      60 TLSv1 with cipher ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
415     270 TLSv1.2 with cipher ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
416     335 TLSv1 with cipher DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
417 \end{verbatim}
418
419 Source: \url{http://www.postfix.org/TLS_README.html}
420
421 \subsubsection{SMTP: opportunistic TLS}
422 % do we need to documment starttls in detail?
423 %\subsubsection{starttls?}
424
425 \subsection{SSH}
426
427 \begin{verbatim}
428         RSAAuthentication yes
429         PermitRootLogin no
430         StrictModes yes
431         HostKey /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key
432         Ciphers aes256-ctr
433         MACs hmac-sha2-512,hmac-sha2-256,hmac-ripemd160
434         KexAlgorithms curve25519-sha256@libssh.org,diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha256,diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha1
435 \end{verbatim}
436
437 % XXX: curve25519-sha256@libssh.org only available upstream(!)
438 Note: older linux systems won't support SHA2, PuTTY does not support RIPE-MD160.
439
440 \subsection{OpenVPN}
441
442 \subsection{IPSec}
443
444 \subsection{PGP}
445
446 \subsection{PRNG settings}
447 \label{section:PRNG}
448
449
450 %%% Local Variables: 
451 %%% mode: latex
452 %%% TeX-master: "applied-crypto-hardening"
453 %%% End: