b384105a3e74bd95831db853beae5c819def3073
[ach-master.git] / presentations / HACK.LU-2014 / presentation / agenda.md
1 % Bettercrypto - Applied Crypto Hardening for Sysadmins
2 % L. Aaron Kaplan <kaplan@cert.at> ;  David Durvaux <david.durvaux@gmail.com>; Aaron Zauner <azet@azet.org>
3 % 2014/10/21
4 ---------------------------
5
6
7
8 # Part 1:  Intro to the project
9
10
11 ![logo](img/logo)
12
13
14 ---
15 # Overview 
16
17   1. Intro & Motivation
18   2. How we got started, how we work, what's there, what's missing, 
19      how to use the guide
20   3. History of Crypto in a nutshell
21   4. Theory
22   4. 10:10 __break__
23   5. Theory (cont.)
24   6. Attacks
25   7. Current trends (IETF, ...)
26   7. wrap up
27   9. 11:45 __lunch__
28     
29
30 # Prerequisites
31
32   * Participants should have a basic knowledge of System administration and be
33 familiar with configuring Apache, nginx, etc.
34   * know git/github
35   * a basic knowledge of crypto will help.
36
37 # Motivation
38
39 ![NSA](img/nsa.png)
40
41 # Motivation (2)
42
43 Please note:
44
45   * the leaks also revealed to non-democratic countries precise recipies on how to do country wide or even Internet-wide surveillance, traffic inspection and -modification, etc.
46   * If politicians in other countries did not know how to do this, now they know!
47   * If criminals did not know how to do this, now they know!
48
49 # The reaction
50
51 \centering { \textbf{Don't give them anything for free}\par
52   It's your home, you fight! }
53
54
55 # The reaction (2)
56
57   * We as humans are used to certain **modes** in communications:
58 spoken words tend to:
59     * be forgotten over time ("data expires")
60     * get modified/changed whenever "copied" (repeated)
61     * get changed/modified over time  ("forgetfullness")
62     * we tend to be not so harsh about them ("forgive")
63     * have a limited geographic range ("town talk")
64     * be very decentralized ("accoustic range")
65   * digital traces/data tends to be:
66     * stored for ever. Never modified by default
67     * used against you in the future
68     * very centralized
69     * copied very easily
70     * always searchable in O(log(n)) 
71     
72   
73 # The reaction (3)
74
75 \centering { \textbf{Crypto is the only thing that might still help}
76 \par
77 a.k.a.:\par
78         ``\textit{The Bottom Line Is That Encryption Does Work}'', Edward Snowden
79 }
80
81 # But where?
82
83   * Ca. August 2013: Adi Kriegisch asks Aaron where he could find good recommendations on SSL settings.
84   * Does that exist? At that time:
85     - no ssllabs cookbook
86     - only theoretical recommendations (ENISA, eCrypt II, NIST)
87     - ioerror's duraconf settings are outdated
88     - no practical copy & paste-able settings exist?
89
90
91 # Project plan
92
93 ![Project plan](img/metalab-world-domination.jpg)
94
95
96 # Project plan  (srsly)
97
98   * Do at least something against the **Cryptocalypse**
99   * Check SSL, SSH, PGP crypto SeIngs in the most common services and certificates:
100     –  Apache, Nginx, lighthNp
101         –  IMAP/POP servers (dovecot, cyrus, ...) –  openssl.conf
102         –  Etc.
103   * Write down our experinces as guide
104   * Create easy, copy & paste-able settings which are "OK" (as far as we know) for sysadmins.
105   * Keep the guide short. There are many good recommendations out there written by cryptographers for cryptographers
106   * Many eyes must check this!
107   * Make it open source
108
109   
110
111
112 # Why is this relevant for you?
113
114   * You run networks and services. These are targets. If you believe it or not.
115   * You produce code. Make sure it uses good crypto coding practices
116
117   * However good crypto is hard to achieve
118   * Crypto does not solve all problems, but it helps
119
120
121 # Who?
122
123 Wolfgang Breyha (uni VIE), David Durvaux (CERT.be), Tobias Dussa (KIT-CERT), L. Aaron Kaplan (CERT.at), Christian Mock (coretec), Daniel Kovacic (A-Trust), Manuel Koschuch (FH Campus Wien), Adi Kriegisch (VRVis), Ramin Sabet (A-Trust), Aaron Zauner (azet.org), Pepi Zawodsky (maclemon.at), IAIK, A-Sit, ...  
124
125
126 # Contents so far
127
128   * Intro
129   * Disclaimer 
130   * Methods 
131   * Theory
132     * Elliptic Curve Cryptography 
133     * Keylengths 
134     * Random Number Generators 
135     * Cipher suites – general overview & how to choose one
136   * Recommendations on practical settings 
137   * Tools 
138   * Links 
139   * Appendix
140
141
142 # Methods and Principles
143
144 C.O.S.H.E.R principle:
145   * **C**ompletely
146   * **O**pen 
147   * **S**ource
148   * **H**eaders
149   * **E**ngineering and
150   * **R**esearch
151
152 Methods:
153   * Public review
154   * commits get **discussed**
155   * recommendations **need** references (like wikipedia)
156   * Every commit gets logged & we need your review!
157
158 # How to commit
159
160   * https://git.bettercrypto.org (master, read-only)
161   * https://github.com/BetterCrypto/ (please clone this one & send PRs)
162
163 How?
164   1. discuss the changes first on the mailinglist
165   2. clone 
166   3. follow the templates 
167   3. send pull requests
168   3. **split the commit into many smaller commits **
169   4. don't be cross if something does not get accepted. 
170   5. be ready for discussion
171  
172 # History part
173
174 XXX FIXME David add stuff XXX
175
176 # Theory part
177
178 \[
179 i \hbar \frac{\partial}{\partial t}\Psi = \hat H \Psi
180 \]
181
182
183 # Some thoughts on ECC
184
185   * Currently this is under heavy debate
186   * Trust the Math
187     * eg. NIST P-256 (http://safecurves.cr.yp.to/rigid.html)
188     * Coefficients generated by hashing the unexplained seed c49d3608 86e70493 6a6678e1 139d26b7 819f7e90.
189   * Might have to change settings tomorrow
190   * Most Applications only work with NIST-Curves
191   * Bottom line: we leave the choice of ECC yes or no to the reader. You might have to adapt again.
192   * However, many server operators tend towards ECC  (speed)
193
194 # Keylengths
195
196   * http://www.keylength.com/ 
197   * Recommended Keylengths, Hashing algorithms, etc.
198   * Currently:
199     * RSA: >= 3248 bits (Ecrypt II)     
200     * ECC: >= 256       
201     * SHA 2+ (SHA 256,…)
202     * AES 128 is good enough
203
204 # AES 128? Is that enough?
205
206 \centering{,,On the choice between AES256 and AES128: I would never consider using AES256, just like I don’t wear a helmet when I sit inside my car. It’s too much bother for the epsilon improvement in security.''\par
207 — Vincent Rijmen in a personal mail exchange Dec 2013
208 }
209   * Some theoretical attacks on AES-256
210
211
212 # (Perfect) Forward Secrecy
213
214 Motivation:
215
216 * Three letter agency (TLA) stores all ssl traffic
217 * Someday TLA gains access to ssl-private key (Brute Force, Physical Force)
218 * TLA can decrypt all stored traffic
219
220 Solution:
221 * **Ephemeral** session keys via Diffie Hellman (**DHE**)
222
223 # Review of Diffie Hellman
224
225 Let g be a primitive root mod p. p is a Prime.
226
227 Alice to Bob: \[ X = g^x \mod p  \]
228 Bob to Alice:  \[ Y = g^y \mod p  \]
229 Alice calculates: \[  k_1 = Y^x \mod p \]
230 Bob calculates:   \[ k_2 = X^y \mod p  
231 \text{. Therefore, } k_1 = k_2 \]
232
233 Proof:
234 \[ k_1 = Y^x = (g^y)^x = g^{(x*y)} = (g^x)^y = X^y = k_2  \mod p \qed \]
235
236
237 # Reality 
238
239 \centerline{\includegraphics[width=2cm]{img/xkcd-TLA.png}}
240
241 # Well...
242
243 We still recommend perfect forward secrecy.
244
245  * Ephemeral: new key for each execution of a key exchange process
246  * SSL private-Key only for authentication
247  * Alternative new ssl private key every x days months
248  * Pro:
249     - Highest Security against future attacks
250  * Contra: 
251     - Elliptic Curve
252     - Processing costs
253
254 # (P)RNGs
255
256   * (P)RNGs **are** important!
257   * Nadia Heninger et al / Lenstra et al
258 ,,… to identify apparently vulnerable devices from 27 manufacturers.''
259 ![mining P's and Q's](img/mining-ps-and-qs.png)
260   * Entropy after startup: embedded devices quite bad
261
262
263 # (P)RNGs - recommendations
264   * Look out for known weak RNG
265     * Dual EC_DRBG is weak (slow, used in RSA-toolkit)
266     * Intel RNG ? Recommendation: add System-Entropy (Network). Entropy only goes up.
267   * Use tools (e.g. haveged/HaveGE http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=945516)
268   * RTFM 
269     * when is the router key generated
270     * Default Keys ?
271   * Re-generate keys from time to time
272
273
274
275 # Cipher suites
276
277 # Some general thoughts on settings
278
279 * General:
280   * Disable SSL 2.0 (weak algorithms)
281   * Disable SSL 3.0 (BEAST vs IE/XP)
282   * Enable TLS 1.0 or better
283   * Disable TLS-Compression (SSL-CRIME Attack)
284   * Implement HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security)
285 * Variant A: fewer supported clients
286 * Variant B: more clients, weaker settings
287
288
289
290
291 # Attacks
292
293 Overview:
294   * BEAST
295   * ...
296
297 XXX FIXME: azet .... XXX
298