Nicer tables
[ach-master.git] / src / theory / cipher_suites / recommended.tex
1 %%\subsection{Recommended cipher suites}
2
3 In principle system administrators who want to improve their communication security
4 have to make a difficult decision between effectively locking out some users and 
5 keeping high cipher suite security while supporting as many users as possible.
6 The website \url{https://www.ssllabs.com/} gives administrators and security engineers
7 a tool to test their setup and compare compatibility with clients. The authors made 
8 use of ssllabs.com to arrive at a set of cipher suites which we will recommend 
9 throughout this document.
10
11 %\textbf{Caution: these settings can only represent a subjective
12 %choice of the authors at the time of writing. It might be a wise choice to
13 %select your own and review cipher suites based on the instructions in section
14 %\ref{section:ChoosingYourOwnCipherSuites}}.
15
16
17 \subsubsection{Configuration A: Strong ciphers, fewer clients}
18
19 At the time of writing, our recommendation is to use the following set of strong cipher
20 suites which may be useful in an environment where one does not depend on many,
21 different clients and where compatibility is not a big issue.  An example
22 of such an environment might be machine-to-machine communication or corporate
23 deployments where software that is to be used can be defined without restrictions.
24
25
26 We arrived at this set of cipher suites by selecting:
27
28 \begin{itemize*}
29   \item TLS 1.2
30   \item Perfect forward secrecy / ephemeral Diffie Hellman
31   \item strong MACs (SHA-2) or
32   \item GCM as Authenticated Encryption scheme
33 \end{itemize*}
34
35 This results in the OpenSSL string:
36
37 \begin{lstlisting}
38 'EDH+aRSA+AES256:EECDH+aRSA+AES256:!SSLv3'
39 \end{lstlisting}
40
41 %$\implies$ resolves to 
42 %
43 %\begin{verbatim}
44 %openssl ciphers -V $string
45 %\end{verbatim}
46
47
48
49 %\todo{make a column for cipher chaining mode} --> not really important, is it?
50 \ctable[caption={Configuration A ciphers},label=tab:conf-a]{lllllll}{}{%
51 \FL \textbf{ID}   & \textbf{OpenSSL Name}       & \textbf{Version} & \textbf{KeyEx} & \textbf{Auth} & \textbf{Cipher} & \textbf{MAC}
52 \ML \texttt{0x009F} & DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384   & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD
53 \NN \texttt{0x006B} & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA256
54 \NN \texttt{0xC030} & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD
55 \NN \texttt{0xC028} & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           &  RSA          & AES(256) (CBC)  & SHA384
56 \LL}
57
58 \paragraph*{Compatibility:}
59
60 At the time of this writing only Win 7 and Win 8.1 crypto stack,
61 OpenSSL $\ge$ 1.0.1e, Safari 6 / iOS 6.0.1 and Safar 7 / OS X 10.9
62 are covered by that cipher string.
63
64 In case you need to support other/different clients, see information
65 about choosing your own cipher string in section
66 \ref{section:ChoosingYourOwnCipherSuites}.
67
68 \subsubsection{Configuration B: Weaker ciphers but better compatibility}
69
70 In this section we propose a slightly weaker set of cipher suites.  For
71 example, there are known weaknesses for the SHA-1 hash function that is
72 included in this set.  The advantage of this set of cipher suites is not only
73 better compatibility with a broad range of clients, but also less computational
74 workload on the provisioning hardware.
75
76
77 \textbf{All further examples in this publication use Configuration B}.\\
78
79 We arrived at this set of cipher suites by selecting:
80
81 \begin{itemize*}
82   \item TLS 1.2, TLS 1.1, TLS 1.0
83   \item allowing SHA-1 (see the comments on SHA-1 in section \ref{section:SHA})
84 \end{itemize*}
85
86 This results in the OpenSSL string:
87 %
88 %'EDH+CAMELLIA:EDH+aRSA:EECDH+aRSA+AESGCM:EECDH+aRSA+SHA384:EECDH+aRSA+SHA256:EECDH:+CAMELLIA256:+AES256:+CAMELLIA128:+AES128:+SSLv3:!aNULL:!eNULL:!LOW:!3DES:!MD5:!EXP:!PSK:!SRP:!DSS:!RC4:!SEED:!ECDSA:CAMELLIA256-SHA:AES256-SHA:CAMELLIA128-SHA:AES128-SHA'
89 \ttbox{\cipherStringB}
90
91 \todo{make a column for cipher chaining mode}
92 \ctable[caption={Configuration B ciphers},label=tab:conf-b]{lllllll}{}{%
93 \FL \textbf{ID}   & \textbf{OpenSSL Name}       & \textbf{Version} & \textbf{KeyEx} & \textbf{Auth} & \textbf{Cipher} & \textbf{MAC}
94 \ML \texttt{0x009F} & DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384   & TLSv1.2          & DH             & RSA           & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD
95 \NN \texttt{0x006B} & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             & RSA           & AES(256)        & SHA256
96 \NN \texttt{0xC030} & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           & RSA           & AESGCM(256)     & AEAD
97 \NN \texttt{0xC028} & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           & RSA           & AES(256)        & SHA384
98 \NN \texttt{0x009E} & DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256   & TLSv1.2          & DH             & RSA           & AESGCM(128)     & AEAD
99 \NN \texttt{0x0067} & DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256       & TLSv1.2          & DH             & RSA           & AES(128)        & SHA256
100 \NN \texttt{0xC02F} & ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           & RSA           & AESGCM(128)     & AEAD
101 \NN \texttt{0xC027} & ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256     & TLSv1.2          & ECDH           & RSA           & AES(128)        & SHA256
102 \NN \texttt{0x0088} & DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA256-SHA     & SSLv3            & DH             & RSA           & Camellia(256)   & SHA1
103 \NN \texttt{0x0039} & DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA          & SSLv3            & DH             & RSA           & AES(256)        & SHA1
104 \NN \texttt{0xC014} & ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA        & SSLv3            & ECDH           & RSA           & AES(256)        & SHA1
105 \NN \texttt{0x0045} & DHE-RSA-CAMELLIA128-SHA     & SSLv3            & DH             & RSA           & Camellia(128)   & SHA1
106 \NN \texttt{0x0033} & DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA          & SSLv3            & DH             & RSA           & AES(128)        & SHA1
107 \NN \texttt{0xC013} & ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA        & SSLv3            & ECDH           & RSA           & AES(128)        & SHA1
108 \NN \texttt{0x0084} & CAMELLIA256-SHA             & SSLv3            & RSA            & RSA           & Camellia(256)   & SHA1
109 \NN \texttt{0x0035} & AES256-SHA                  & SSLv3            & RSA            & RSA           & AES(256)        & SHA1
110 \NN \texttt{0x0041} & CAMELLIA128-SHA             & SSLv3            & RSA            & RSA           & Camellia(128)   & SHA1
111 \NN \texttt{0x002F} & AES128-SHA                  & SSLv3            & RSA            & RSA           & AES(128)        & SHA1
112 \LL}
113 \paragraph*{Compatibility: }
114
115 Note that these cipher suites will not work with Windows XP's crypto stack (e.g. IE, Outlook), 
116 %%Java 6, Java 7 and Android 2.3. Java 7 could be made compatible by installing the "Java 
117 %%Cryptography Extension (JCE) Unlimited Strength Jurisdiction Policy Files"
118 %%(JCE) \footnote{\url{http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jce-7-download-432124.html}}.
119 We could not verify yet if installing JCE also fixes the Java 7
120 DH-parameter length limitation (1024 bit). 
121 \todo{do that!}
122
123 \paragraph*{Explanation: }
124
125 For a detailed explanation of the cipher suites chosen, please see
126 \ref{section:ChoosingYourOwnCipherSuites}. In short, finding a single perfect cipher
127 string is practically impossible and there must be a tradeoff between compatibility and security. 
128 On the one hand there are mandatory and optional ciphers defined in a few RFCs, 
129 on the other hand there are clients and servers only implementing subsets of the 
130 specification.
131
132 Straight forward, the authors wanted strong ciphers, forward secrecy
133 \footnote{\url{http://nmav.gnutls.org/2011/12/price-to-pay-for-perfect-forward.html}}
134 and the best client compatibility possible while still ensuring a cipher string that can be
135 used on legacy installations (e.g. OpenSSL 0.9.8). 
136
137 Our recommended cipher strings are meant to be used via copy and paste and need to work
138 "out of the box".
139
140 \begin{itemize*}
141   \item TLSv1.2 is preferred over TLSv1.0 (while still providing a useable cipher
142       string for TLSv1.0 servers).
143   \item AES256 and CAMELLIA256 count as very strong ciphers at the moment.
144   \item AES128 and CAMELLIA128 count as strong ciphers at the moment
145   \item DHE or ECDHE for forward secrecy
146   \item RSA as this will fit most of today's setups
147   \item AES256-SHA as a last resort: with this cipher at the end, even server
148       systems with very old OpenSSL versions will work out of the box (version 0.9.8 for example does not
149       provide support for ECC and TLSv1.1 or above). \newline
150       Note however that this cipher suite will not provide forward secrecy. It
151       is meant to provide the same client coverage (eg. support Microsoft crypto
152       libraries) on legacy setups.
153 \end{itemize*}