Merge pull request #18 from krono/latex-cleanups
[ach-master.git] / src / disclaimer.tex
1 \section{Disclaimer and scope}
2 \label{section:disclaimer}
3 \label{sec:disclaimer-scope}
4
5 \epigraph{``A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and life is after all a chain''}{William James}
6 \epigraph{``Encryption works. Properly implemented strong crypto systems are
7 one of the few things that you can rely on. Unfortunately, endpoint security is
8 so terrifically weak that NSA can frequently find ways around it.''}{Edward
9 Snowden, answering questions live on the Guardian's
10 website~\cite{snowdenGuardianGreenwald}}
11
12
13 This guide specifically does not address physical security, protecting software
14 and hardware against exploits, basic IT security housekeeping, information
15 assurance techniques, traffic analysis attacks, issues with key-roll over and
16 key management, securing client PCs and mobile devices (theft, loss), proper
17 OPSec\footnote{\url{http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operations_security}}, social
18 engineering attacks, anti-tempest~\cite{Wikipedia:Tempest} attack techniques,
19 protecting against different side-channel attacks (timing--, cache timing--,
20 differential fault analysis, differential power analysis or power monitoring
21 attacks), downgrade attacks, jamming the encrypted channel or other similar
22 attacks which are typically employed to circumvent strong encryption.  The
23 authors can not overstate the importance of these other techniques.  Interested
24 readers are advised to read about these attacks in detail since they give a lot
25 of insight into other parts of cryptography engineering which need to be dealt
26 with.\footnote{An easy to read yet very insightful recent example is the
27 "FLUSH+RELOAD" technique~\cite{yarom2013flush+} for leaking cryptographic keys
28 from one virtual machine to another via L3 cache timing attacks.}
29
30 This guide does not talk much about the well-known insecurities of trusting a
31 public-key infrastructure (PKI)\footnote{Interested readers are referred to
32 \url{https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=647959} or
33 \url{http://www.heise.de/security/meldung/Der-ehrliche-Achmed-bittet-um-Vertrauen-1231083.html}
34 (german) which brings the problem of trusting PKIs right to the point}. Nor
35 does this text fully explain how to run your own Certificate Authority (CA). 
36
37
38 Most of this zoo of information security issues are addressed in the very
39 comprehensive book ``Security Engineering'' by Ross Anderson~\cite{anderson2008security}. 
40
41 For some experts in cryptography this text might seem too informal. However, we
42 strive to keep the language as non-technical as possible and fitting for our
43 target audience: system administrators who can collectively improve the
44 security level for all of their users. 
45
46
47
48 \epigraph{``Security is a process, not a product.''}{Bruce Schneier}
49
50 This guide can only describe what the authors currently
51 \emph{believe} to be the best settings based on their personal experience and
52 after intensive cross checking with literature and experts. For a complete list
53 of people who reviewed this paper, see the \nameref{section:Reviewers}.
54 Even though multiple specialists reviewed the guide, the authors can give
55 \emph{no guarantee whatsoever} that they made the right recommendations. Keep in
56 mind that tomorrow there might be new attacks on some ciphers and many of the
57 recommendations in this guide might turn out to be wrong. Security is a
58 process.
59
60
61 We therefore recommend that system administrators keep up to date with recent
62 topics in IT security and cryptography. 
63
64
65 In this sense, this guide is very focused on getting the cipher strings done
66 right even though there is much more to do in order to make a system more
67 secure.  We the authors, need this document as much as the reader needs it.
68
69 \subsection*{Scope}
70 \label{section:Scope}
71
72 In this guide, we restricted ourselves to:
73 \begin{itemize}
74 \item Internet-facing services
75 \item Commonly used services
76 \item Devices which are used in business environments (this specifically excludes XBoxes, Playstations and similar consumer devices)
77 \item OpenSSL 
78 \end{itemize}
79
80 We explicitly excluded:
81 \begin{itemize}
82 \item Specialized systems (such as medical devices, most embedded systems, etc.)
83 \item Wireless Access Points
84 \item Smart-cards/chip cards
85 %\item Advice on running a PKI or a CA
86 %\item Services which should be run only in an internal network and never face the Internet.
87 \end{itemize}
88
89
90 %%% Local Variables: 
91 %%% mode: latex
92 %%% TeX-master: "applied-crypto-hardening"
93 %%% End: